Albert Abrams

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Albert Abrams
Albert Abrams - Pearson's Magazine (48.6, p. 8) - 1922-06.jpg
As seen in Pearson's Magazine (June 1922)
Born 8 December 1863(1863-12-08)
San Francisco, California
Died 13 January 1924 (60)
San Francisco, California
Nationality American
Alma mater Hahnemann Medical College of the Pacific (1878-81); University of Heidelberg (1881-82)
Field(s) Medicine
Affiliations College of Electronic Medicine
Known for Electronic Reactions of Abrams (ERA)

Albert Abrams (December 8, 1863 - January 13, 1924) was an American physician and developer of a variety of alternative medical theories, including Spondylotherapy and his Electronic Reactions of Abrams, a precursor to radionics and similar technologies.

Selected Bibliography

  • Abrams, Albert, ed. (1895), Transactions of the Antiseptic Club, New York: E. B. Treat 
  • Abrams, Albert (1901), Nervous Breakdown: Its Concomitant Evils: Its Prevention and Cure, a Correct Technique of Living for Brain Workers, San Francisco: Hicks-Judd Co. 
  • Abrams, Albert (1906), Man and His Poisons: a Practical Exposition of the Causes, Symptoms and Treatment of Self-Poisoning, New York: E. B. Treat and Co. 
  • Abrams, Albert (1910), Spondylotherapy: Spinal Concussion and the Application of Other Methods to the Spine in the Treatment of Disease, San Francisco, Cal.: The Philopolis Press 
  • Abrams, Albert (1914), Human Energy, San Francisco, Cal. 
  • Abrams, Albert (1916), New Concepts In Diagnosis and Treatment: Physico-clinical Medicine, the Practical Application of the Electronic Theory in the Interpretation and Treatment of Disease, With an Appendix on New Scientific Facts, San Francisco, Calif.: The Philopolis Press 
  • Abrams, Albert (1918), Popular Demonstration of Thought-Transference and Kindred Phenomena, San Francisco, Cal.: Philopolis Press 
  • Abrams, Albert, The Electronic Reactions of Dr. Abrams (and Other Writings) 

Abrams was also the founder and editor of the journals "Physico-Clinical Medicine" (later "Journal of Electronic Medicine") and "Electronic Medical Digest".

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