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Arthur C. Lingelbach

From Kook Science

Arthur Chester Lingelbach was an American "industrial enterprise promoter" who briefly attained notoriety over his Super Utilities, Inc. stock company,[1] through which he claimed he was developing a therapeutic medical device called the "Super-U-Wave,"[2] as well as a perpetual-motion refrigerator,[3] a new form of television, and a high-speed airplane. Lingelbach's enterprise came to the attention of New York prosecutors during 1936 in part due to his method of soliciting investors: they were sent by medium Alma Nelson, who purported to channel Suda, "Son of Solitude of the Lost Isle of Atlantis," the voice claiming that Lingelbach was the reincarnation of the brother of the engineer who built the Pyramids. While at trial over an injunction to ban sales of company stock, Lingelbach boasted that he had worked alongside Thomas Edison, Charles Proteus Steinmetz, Henry Ford, Lee de Forest, and Luther Burbank, making extraordinary claims regarding his accomplishments and scientific background; neither these claims, nor a signed petition by still convinced investors,[T] seem to have convinced the court as to the legitimacy of the offering, as the company was ultimately dissolved.

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  1. "Super-Utilities, Inc.", Robert D. Fisher Manual of Extinct or Obsolete Companies, p. 480, "It was reported on July 20th, 1936, that Supreme Court Justice McLaughlin termed the stock of this company as worthless. Deputy Attorney General O'Hanlon charged that the enterprise is a stock swindle from start to finish, according to reports." 
  2. An advertisement in American Medicine for March 1936 (p. 171) described the "Super-U-Wave" as a high-frequency apparatus that would "lessen the necessity for surgery in such localized infections as furuncle, boils, carbuncles, middle-ear infections, salpingitis," etc.
  3. Bennett, Jr., John J. (15 June 1941), "HOW NOT TO SPEND YOUR MONEY", Evening Star (Washington D.C.): 4 (93), https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1941-06-15/ed-1/seq-93/, "First, beware of the 'scientific' sharper. Science has made such wondrous progress that a crook who can mix a little science jargon in his sales talk rakes in money as fast as he can spend it. Arthur Lingelbach posed as an engineer. He was small, suave, dignified and gray, and he told tales of his Super Utilities Company and his perpetual-motion machine that charmed thousands of dollars out of the pockets of simple folks. The machine was to be enclosed in a refrigerator. You wound up his marvelous secret spring and this kept the box cold without the use of gas or electricity. There would be millions in it!"